Cheap Travel Insurance For People With Hypertension

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If you suffer with hypertension then it’s important that you disclose it to your travel insurance company before you go on holiday. If you don’t disclose your hypertension on your application for travel insurance it could invalidate a claim leaving you with a big bill for medical expenses and repatriation costs too which, if a private air ambulance is required, could be tens of thousands pounds. If you suffer with hypertension then this link may help you find competitive travel insurance.

What Is Hypertension?

Hypertension (HTN) sometimes called arterial hypertension, is a chronic medical condition in which the blood pressure in the arteries is elevated. This requires the heart to work harder than normal to circulate blood through the blood vessels. Blood pressure is summarised by two measurements, systolic and diastolic, which depend on whether the heart muscle is contracting (systole) or relaxed between beats (diastole) and equate to a maximum and minimum pressure, respectively. Normal blood pressure at rest is within the range of 100-140mmHg systolic (top reading) and 60-90mmHg diastolic (bottom reading). High blood pressure is said to be present if it is persistently at or above 140/90 mmHg.

Hypertension is classified as either primary (essential) hypertension or secondary hypertension; about 90–95% of cases are categorized as "primary hypertension" which means high blood pressure with no obvious underlying medical cause. The remaining 5–10% of cases (secondary hypertension) are caused by other conditions that affect the kidneys, arteries, heart or endocrine system.

Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, myocardial infarction (heart attacks), heart failure, aneurysms of the arteries (e.g. aortic aneurysm), peripheral arterial disease and is a cause of chronic kidney disease. Even moderate elevation of arterial blood pressure is associated with a shortened life expectancy. Dietary and lifestyle changes can improve blood pressure control and decrease the risk of associated health complications, although drug treatment is often necessary in people for whom lifestyle changes are not enough or not effective.

Hypertension is rarely accompanied by any symptoms, and its identification is usually through screening, or when seeking healthcare for an unrelated problem.

On physical examination, hypertension may be suspected on the basis of the presence of hypertensive retinopathy detected by examination of the optic fundus found in the back of the eye using ophthalmoscopy. Classically, the severity of the hypertensive retinopathy changes is graded from grade I–IV, although the milder types may be difficult to distinguish from each other. Ophthalmoscopy findings may also give some indication as to how long a person has been hypertensive.

Severely elevated blood pressure (equal to or greater than a systolic 180 or diastolic of 110 — sometime termed malignant or accelerated hypertension) is referred to as a "hypertensive crisis", as blood pressures above these levels are known to confer a high risk of complications. People with blood pressures in this range may have no symptoms, but are more likely to report headaches (22% of cases) and dizziness than the general population. Other symptoms accompanying a hypertensive crisis may include visual deterioration or breathlessness due to heart failure or a general feeling of malaise due to renal failure. Most people with a hypertensive crisis are known to have elevated blood pressure, but additional triggers may have led to a sudden rise.

Travel Insurance For People With Hypertension Need Not Be Expensive If You Shop Around

Travel insurance to include a disclosure of hypertension need not be expensive if you shop around and find a specialist that can select the right underwriter for your particular circumstances. For example the price of your travel insurance will be influenced by your specific symptoms of the disease, your age and the destination and the length of your stay.